PREVENTING HUMAN TRAFFICKING & SCAMS

Stop scams and human trafficking before they happen

 

Welcome to Prevention vs Cure, your ultimate guide to preventing scams and human trafficking. We help individuals and companies stay safe from fraudulent job opportunities and exploitation. With our expertise and guidance, you can be sure that you are making informed decisions about your career and safety.

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WHY DO WE CARE?

Established in April 2015, we have a heart to see Human Trafficking abolished and injustice ended. By partnering with other anti-Human Trafficking organisations, locally and abroad, we can fight Human Trafficking and in effect end it.

Prevention Vs. Cure (PvsC) is an initiative of STOP (Stop Trafficking Of People), which has been operating in the anti-Human Trafficking arena since 2008. As an offshoot of STOP, PvsC is 100% focused on the prevention of Human Trafficking and scams.

If we can prevent a person from being trafficked

then time and resources don’t have to be spent

on the process of restoration.

AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION GOES A LONG WAY

We exist to prevent Human Trafficking and scams. We will investigate your plan, free of charge. We will also make sure that where you are traveling to is safe, warn you of Human Trafficking hot spots and look into whether your potential employers and their job offer is legitimate.

WAYS TO SPOT A JOB SCAM

1

Is the job too good to be true?

Scammers often offer overpaid remote positions to entice their victims. One fraudulent job ad offered a position working from home with flexible hours and a salary of up to £300 per day. If the opportunity sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Have you been hired on the spot?

There is usually a thorough process for hiring someone for a well-paid position. As an employer, you want to make sure that you’re hiring the right person, so there are usually multiple interviews, tasks and background checks, If you’re offered a job based on a chat you have on social media, that’s usually a red flag.

2

3

How has the person contacted you?

Scammers often impersonate recruiters and send messages via text, email and WhatsApp, normally with an element of urgency in the messages. Any employment decision for a large organisation should come through an official channel. Amazon, for example, states that any emails about job offers will only come from an amazon.com address. If it’s sent from a Gmail account, it’s probably a scam.

Are there any mistakes in the correspondence?

Similarly, if the email contains spelling errors, it’s worth double-checking its veracity. Some victims have even seen scammers spell the name of the company they’re impersonating incorrectly or use the name of someone who has no record of working for the business. “If you look up the employer and you’re still not sure, just move on and keep searching,”

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5

Have they asked for money?

If any fees are required to secure the job or there are upfront costs, it should be clear that it’s a scam. Burridge claims that some people have been “asked to pay fees for administration and travel – or in some cases for fraudulent courses, background checks and other non-existent services”. Similarly, requests to pay for remote work equipment up front are also becoming more common and, if a cheque is involved at any point, that is usually a tell-tale sign it’s a scam.

Complaints about job opportunity scams

are increasing. If you’re not sure about a job offer, contact us.

We can look into it for you.

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and human trafficking

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Account Name: STOP Trafficking Of People NPC
Account Number: 623 454 328 85
Branch Code: 200510 Somerset West, SA
Bank: First National Bank
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